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Access Netflix, Hulu Plus from non-USA location

April 12th, 2015 by Jabez Gan [MVP]

appsThere has been a lot of responses directly to me regarding configuring OpenWRT (Or any router) to allow Roku/your Smart TV to access Netflix, Hulu Plus or Amazon Prime. Let me write about the 3 steps process on enabling your Roku devices (in my example) to access Netflix in any non-USA country.

Post 1: VPN Service. Why do you need it.

Post 2: Configure VPN on OpenWRT

Post 3: Route only traffic from a particular Internal IP through VPN in OpenWRT

 

Post 1: VPN Service. Why do you need it.

Without VPN, when we access Netflix, Netflix will be able to see our originating IP address (or our originating country). As you are already aware (are you?), Netflix is only available for USA viewers.

With VPN, Netflix will think that we are located in USA (although we are connecting from a non-USA region). The traffic goes out from our PC/streaming player, to our local ISP. The data is then routed back to the USA VPN Server, and the data is then encapsulated and passes to Netflix service. I hope I did not lose you.

Anyway, based on my test, below are some VPN Services that worked best/stable:

VPNAce

It works for the following devices:

apps

If you are looking for a VPN Service that allows you to watch Netflix, purchase one of the VPN Services above and let me know if it helps!

Posted in Computing, OpenWRT | Comments Off on Access Netflix, Hulu Plus from non-USA location

OpenWRT – Configure Dynamic DNS

March 16th, 2015 by Jabez Gan [MVP]

  What is Dynamic DNS:

Dynamic DNS (DDNS or DynDNS) is a method of automatically updating a name server in the Domain Name System (DNS), often in real time, with the active DNS configuration of its configured hostnames, addresses or other information.

Configure Dynamic DNS in OpenWRT:

Pre-requisites:

  1. This post is written based on OpenWrt Barrier Breaker 14.07

Steps:

  1. Login to your OpenWRT Admin (by default is 192.168.1.1)
  2. Select Systems -> Software
  3. Under Filter, type in “luci-app-ddns”. Click Find Package.
  4. openwrt-ddns1
  5. Then click on “Available Packages”. Next to Luci-app-ddns, click Install.
  6. Once Luci-app-ddns is installed, you should see a new option called “Services” between the “System” and “Network”
  7. Select Services ->  Dynamic DNS
  8. Define the dynamic DNS configuration parameters as per the screenshot and click Save
  9. openwrt-ddns2
  10. Lastly, go to System -> Startup.
  11. Locate the Service called “DDNS” and click on “Disabled” to enable it.
  12. openwrt-ddns3

Comment here if you are having issues! 🙂

Posted in OpenWRT | Comments Off on OpenWRT – Configure Dynamic DNS

Configure Astro IPTV using a Custom Router (OpenWRT) – Updated 1

February 7th, 2015 by Jabez Gan [MVP]

By default, with Astro IPTV, you will be getting a Technicolor device from Maxis.

I will show you how to replace the Technicolor and replace it with an OpenWRT router (I’m using “OpenWrt Barrier Breaker 14.07”).

Pre-requisites:

  1. Ensure that your router is already flashed to the OpenWRT version. See this post if you have not done so: Installing OpenWRT.

Setup of OpenWRT, Connect to PPPoE (after flashing to OpenWRT):

  1. Change Password. On opening OpenWRT router, you will be asked to login. The default password for OpenWRT is empty. Login and change your password.
  2. Connect to PPPoE. First thing you want to do is to connect to PPPoE, so your WAN will be able to connect to the TM fiber device. Click Network -> Interface -> next to WAN, click Edit. Change the protocol to PPPoE-WAN. Specify your username “5 digits@home.maxis.com.my or 5 digits@public.maxis.com.my”. Password by default should be the your 5 digits with a value 1 behind. Eg, if your username is 12345@home.maxis.com.my, your password will be 123451.
  3. Click Save and Apply.

wan

Create new VLAN for Maxis home fibre and Astro IPTV:

  1. Switch. Click Network -> Switch.
  2. Under VLAN ID, modify the value 2 to value 621.
  3. Port 1 by default should be your WAN port. Ensure that CPU and Port 1 both are set to “Tagged”. Leave the rest of Ports as Off.
  4. Click ADD. Change the VLAN ID for the new VLAN Interface to 823.
  5. With your Astro IPTV decoder plugged into your router’s Port 4, it should be then Port 5 in the OpenWRT Switch interface. Under VLAN ID 823, ensure that CPU, Port 1 both are “Tagged”. For Port 5, set it as “Untagged”. Rest set as Off. Under VLAN ID 1, turn off the tagging for Port 5.
  6. Click Save and Apply.

switch

Tie the WAN Interface to VLAN 621.:

  1. Go to Network -> Interface.
  2. Under WAN, click Edit.
  3. Under Physical Settings, select “eth0.621”

wan2

Create a new interface for IPTV and configure the firewall:

  1. Go to Network -> Interface
  2. Click Add new Interface.
  3. Define the new name “IPTV”
  4. Protocol: Static Address
  5. Cover the following interface: eth0.823
  6. Click Submit.
  7. IPv4 Address: 192.168.2.1
  8. IPv4: 255.255.255.0
  9. Under Firewall Settings, under create:, type in “iptv”
  10. Save & Apply
  11. Under Interface, DHCP Server, click “Setup DHCP Server”.
  12. Under DHCP Server, click “Advanced Settings” tab.
  13. Ensure that “Force DHCP on this network even if another server is detected” is selected.
  14. Save & Apply
  15. Network -> Firewall, under IPTV, select the Edit icon.
  16. Ensure that “Allow Forward to destination zones” is selected for WAN.
  17. Click Save & Apply.

iptv1iptv2iptv3

Install IGMPProxy 

  1. Click System -> Software
  2. Click Update Lists.
  3. Under Filter, type in “IGMPproxy”
  4. click Available Packages. Click Install next to IGMPPROXY.

igmpdownload

Configure IGMPProxy

  1. Download PUTTY, run it and connect to your router
  2. Under Login As, type “root”. Press Enter.
  3. Type in your OpenWRT password.
  4. Type in:
    1. cd /etc/config
    2. vi igmpproxy
  5. Modify the “192.168.1.0/24” to “192.168.2.0/24” (see this link on how to use VI to edit)
  6. Reboot OpenWRT.

putty1putty2putty3putty4

Now check if Astro IPTV is still working. 🙂

The overview of my interface:

interface

Good luck!

Posted in Computing, OpenWRT | Comments Off on Configure Astro IPTV using a Custom Router (OpenWRT) – Updated 1

Who wants to know how Windows Live Messenger actually works?

December 27th, 2006 by Zack Whittaker

Oh it’s really rather simple once you look at it from all the right angles! Here’s a nice little visual representation of the “Messenger Relay” system of which sends and receives all your messages. I’ve basic’d it down as much as I can because it does get tricky in places. Click the thumbnail to view a larger shot.

1. The user starts the session by double clicking a contact.
2. The user’s Windows Live ID credentials are sent across to the Windows Live ID Credentials server for further verification
3. The information is passed through a incoming only firewall to the dispatch server. This is the first point of connection for the message being sent.
4. Depending where the user is in the world, a connection will be made to the local notification server. There are main ones in Singapore, Dublic, Redmond and Reading. This keeps the connection between the two users alive, and keeps things updated such as user status, chat requests and email notifications from Windows Live Mail/Hotmail.
5. The message itself doesn’t go near the notification servers – it is passed onto the switchboard server which is the where all the messages and files are exchanged. The user starting the chat can talk to one user, whilst using another switchboard session to talk to someone else, and another switchboard session for someone else still – without even knowing it. Invitations, file transfers and video/voice chat are also sent through here.
6. The information is then relayed back through an outgoing firewall and checks the user is still online. If the user is offline by the time the message is ready to be received, then it’ll bounce back and be saved on the switchboard session until the user logs back on again. If they are online, they will receive the message.

This is all done in the space of around 2 seconds – most of the time your message will be sent at least twice around the world, in the space of 2 seconds. Not bad eh?

Posted in Networking, Windows Live Messenger | 20 Comments »

Wireless Client Update for Windows XP

December 15th, 2006 by Patrick S

Windows XP SP2 Update KB917021 was published on October 17th 2006. What’s that you say?

It’s an update to “help prevent the Windows wireless client from advertising the wireless networks in its preferred networks list”. Those of you that travel with confidential information might want to investigate this patch. It wasn’t included in Microsoft’s monthly updates.

Advertising the name of your preferred networks creates the potential for a man-in-the-middle attack. This patch won’t stop your Windows notebook from using a spoofed network, but it will fix it so that the hacker would have to guess the name.

You can find more details on this from Brian Krebs and Knowledge Base article 917021. You can download it from Microsoft’s Download Center – Validation Required.

 

This update is further to the ones that were released on Tuesday where several code execution vulnerabilities. However December update does not include a patch for the number of recently discovered Word vulnerabilities.

Info Sourced from F-Secure.com

Posted in Networking, Products, Security, Windows XP | Comments Off on Wireless Client Update for Windows XP

Link Layer Topology Discovery (LLTD) Responder

November 23rd, 2006 by Patrick S

If you were testing Vista on the same network with a Windows XP machiene you may have wondered why the XP computer did not show up in your “Network Map” in the Network Control Centre.

Well the simple reason is that Windows XP couldn’t/wouldn’t respond to the LLTD Call made by Windows Vista over your network. (LLTD enables device discovery via the data-link layer and determines the topology of a network ((802.3 Ethernet & 802.11)).
So in reply to this Microsoft have released the Link Layer Topology Discovery (LLTD) responder for Windows XP computers. This in turn will allow you to see a graphical view of your network layout.

To download the LLTD Responder Click HERE or visit the KB Article

I am unsure weather the LLTD Protocol is built into Windows Server as I have not tested it. However if it is not there is not Patch for it as of yet.

-Patrick S

LLTD Demo

Demo of the LLDT Network Map Screen

Posted in Networking, Windows Vista, Windows XP | Comments Off on Link Layer Topology Discovery (LLTD) Responder