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Explaining Windows Internet Explorer 7+

May 24th, 2006 by Zack Whittaker

The reason why Windows XP and Windows Server 2003 copies of Windows Internet Explorer 7 are branded as “Windows Internet Explorer 7” in the About dialog, whilst in Vista it is referred to as “Windows Internet Explorer 7+” is because of the main difference in the operating systems.

Vista has a core of security – I mean the whole thing is based on security and making everything incredibly secure. Having the 7+ identifies that the Vista copy of IE7 has extended features that integrate with the operating system itself, such as Parental Controls which restricts what specific users access, and Protected Mode which helps virtualise areas of the disk so that if anything harmful access the machine, then it won’t attack the computer.

So basically, the 7+ version is the Vista one and will harbour some of the core security features of the operating system, whilst 7 is just for Windows XP and Windows Server 2003 which won’t be less secure in anyway and will still have all the same features as 7+ except not have the core operating system parts. Hope that makes sense! 🙂

Posted in Internet Explorer, Windows Vista | 1 Comment »


This entry was posted on Wednesday, May 24th, 2006 at 1:53 pm and is filed under Internet Explorer, Windows Vista. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.


One Response

  1. John Lamansky » Blog Archive » Internet Explorer 7+ vs. Internet Explorer 7 Says:

    […] I don’t know about you, but I had never even heard of the concept of “Internet Explorer 7+” until I read a post from the MSBLOG that explains what IE 7+ is and what the difference is between it and regular IE 7: Vista has a core of security – I mean the whole thing is based on security and making everything incredibly secure. Having the 7+ identifies that the Vista copy of IE7 has extended features that integrate with the operating system itself, such as Parental Controls which restricts what specific users access, and Protected Mode which helps virtualise areas of the disk so that if anything harmful access the machine, then it won’t attack the computer. […]